Social Inclusion and Stakeholder Engagement in Mexico Strengthening Entrepreneurship in Productive Forest Landscapes Project

Social Inclusion and Stakeholder Engagement in Mexico Strengthening Entrepreneurship in Productive Forest Landscapes Project​

The Mexico ISFL program, which includes the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and ISFL-financed Mexico Strengthening Entrepreneurship in Productive Forest Landscapes Project (SEPFLP) aims to support a total of 370,015 beneficiaries.

Social Safeguards. The Mexico ISFL program, which includes the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and ISFL-financed Mexico Strengthening Entrepreneurship in Productive Forest Landscapes Project (SEPFLP) aims to support about 370,015 beneficiaries under IBRD project with additionally expected beneficiaries of the ISFL Program to be defined in the course of the program preparation.

 Forest- dependent Indigenous Peoples and vulnerable groups. Over 12 million people in Mexico live in forests, most of whom live in poverty and directly depend on local natural resources. Poverty rates are higher among indigenous people, who account for nearly 50 percent of forest-dependent people. To ensure Indigenous Peoples benefit from the future ISFL program, an Indigenous Peoples Planning Framework (IPPF) is prepared to ensure that indigenous peoples concerns and vulnerabilities of these groups are considered by the underlying activities. IPPF identifies the potential positive and negative impacts on IPs by the project and provide recommendations on how to screen for them and avoid them, but also how to promote their participation in the ER Program and benefits. 

 Gender. Women in Mexico are more likely to be poor and marginalized than men. 88 percent of women in Mexico live in highly marginalized areas, 62 percent live in poverty with limited access to education, healthcare, and employment, 15 percent of Mexican women (primarily older women) are illiterate, and therefore struggle to apply for services and subsidy programs. 

Mexican women’s needs are often ignored at the community level, as they lack opportunities to become involved in decision-making structures, such as the ejido and community assembly. The leadership structure of these decision-making bodies is usually organized by the most senior members, most of whom are men, leading to the marginalization of young people and women. Without an opportunity to participate in these leadership roles, women and youth are left out of local decision-making procedures. They also have limited participation in the management of forest landscapes due to cultural, socioeconomic, and institutional factors. Only 19.8 percent of ejidatarios and comuneros (holders of land property rights) are women. Women’s participation in community forest management programs in Mexico is very low. On average, less than 25% of direct beneficiaries are women due in part to the legally established collective land tenure system, as well as governance structures, that tend to benefit men. As a result, some of the main barriers to women’s active participation in community forest management are legal and institutional in nature. Eligibility criteria for these community forestry programs are conditioned on land tenure and women rarely participate in the communities’ governance body. Other barriers to women’s participation include gender norms and access to information and resources. These constraints have been examined under various gender studies, especially a sector-wide gender analysis that has been conducted Closing the Gender Gap in Natural Resource Management Programs in Mexico

 Stakeholder Engagement. Consultative Technical Committee for REDD+ (CTC-REDD+), which is a national dialogue platform with representatives from diverse government agencies, NGOs, indigenous peoples, community, and academic representatives, as well as the private sector. The CTC-REDD+ was created in 2010 and it has been actively participating in the National Strategy process and in defining other preparatory REDD+ actions, through several themed working groups.

The CTC-REDD+ was set up in Chiapas, Campeche, in the Yucatán Peninsula (Regional CTC-REDD+), and in Quintana Roo in 2011 and in Yucatán in 2013. The general guidelines for benefit sharing were discussed in a specific panel discussion during the national workshop of the CTC-REDD+ held on March 30, 2016.

 Feedback and Grievances Redress Mechanism. While program design has not yet been defined, Mexico’s Forest Commission (CONAFOR) does have an operational FGRM that is part of the Bank’s periodic supervision. The FGRM includes a variety of available communication channels, which ensure accessibility, cultural pertinence, equity, transparency, and feedback, including via telephone, internet and in-person through state offices. In addition, the FGRM considers three forms of response with separate feedback channels and responsibilities, taking into consideration the nature of the request (e.g., request for information from and/or suggestion provided to CONAFOR, project-related complaint or concern, and/or request for more general public agency information). A need for additional FGRM uptake mechanisms will be assessed in the course of the ISFL program preparation.

FGRM website: https://www.gob.mx/conafor/documentos/mecanismo-de-atencion-ciudadana-ma...

 Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Framework. 

Indicator EOP Target EOP Target % Women FY18 Results FY19 Results
T1.1 Number of people reached with benefits from ISFL programs 56,057 no disaggregation given 0  
T2.O1.5 Land users who have adopted sustainable land management practices as a result of ISFL support 56,057 no disaggregation given  0  

 Contact of Mexico’s Forest Commission (CONAFOR):

Website: https://www.gob.mx/conafor
E-mail: conafor@conafor.gob.mx